Seasons

Summer

Bedding plants for summer

Pansy Variety

Colour is the first thing that catches the eye in a garden, and is achieved by the clever use of bedding plants.
In spring and summer, our nurseries are bursting with tempting varieties of seedlings, but before you go shopping, plan what you want to plant, and prepare your soil. This should be done at least one week prior to planting.
Remove all weeds and other rubbish from the bed. Generously spread well-rotted compost over the area, and a handful of bonemeal or super phosphate per square metre. Work well into the soil, rake and level the ground then water with a watering can.
The seedlings that you choose from your nursery, must be strong and healthy.
Make sure that the stems are not blemished or discoloured and that the roots generally are not overgrown The leaves should grow right down near the base of the stem and the plant colour should be a good, uniform green.

Text extracted from MWEB gardening

 

Autumn

Autumn in the garden

Autumn

Nature intended that leaves would fall in autumn to act as a mulch for forest wildlife. Don't denude your garden of vital protection this winter by raking up and sending all your leaves to the dump.
The best way to help the wildlife is to make sure that there is a thick layer of mulch between the shrubs. During summer and especially through autumn all the cut grass and fallen leaves should be placed around the shrubs.
This layer of mulch should form a thick porous mat that will provide an invaluable wintering area for frogs, toads, lizards and insects. Try not to disarrange the mulch during the winter as this may disturb the diverse life forms which are dependent on it.
If you have been piling everything onto the compost heap, now is the time to spread it onto the beds. Use old composting area for something more attractive, like planting indigenous shrubs.

Text extracted from MWEB gardening

 

Winter

Surviving

Winter

Many plants from cold countries become dormant during winter and growth slows down during cold weather. When the temperature drops below freezing point, frost is caused.
Ice forming in plant cells actually robs the plant of moisture as well as rupturing the cell. If a frozen plant is damaged badly it becomes incapable of absorbing moisture again and will not recover even if it is watered before the sun reaches it.
Frost damage is not so severe in moist places as the plants are then not so severely deprived of moisture.
Hardy plants will grow normally again after the ice that has formed in the tissues thaws.
A semi-hardy plant continues growing after portions of it have been killed.
A tender plant will be killed completely by frost.
Frost accompanied by wind is more penetrating and destructive and is known as "Black Frost".

Text extracted from MWEB gardening

 

Spring

Spring

Spring in the garden

Perennials:
As the temperature rises and the days become significantly longer, plant life starts to grow more rapidly, so a good idea now is to put in some supports for those taller herbaceous perennials that tend to fall over at the first sign of wind or rain. There are numerous devices on the market to help you support your plants such as L-shaped stakes that link together and wire hoops etc. But if you can lay your hands on some twigs/pea sticks, these can be pushed into the ground and the tops bent over and entwined, forming a more natural frame for the plants to grow into.
Lawns:
The lawns will be in need of regular cutting now it is also a good time to top-dress and feed the lawn with L.A.N or 3:2:1 (28) slow release fertiliser and water well.
Vegetables:
In the vegetable garden there is a lot to do, many things can be sown now including:- Beetroot, Broad Bean, Carrot, Lettuce, Onion, Peas, Radishes, Spinach, Summer Cabbage and Cauliflower, and Turnips. Early varieties of potatoes can be planted. In the green house or window ledge you can sow tomatoes and sweet corn for planting out later.

Text extracted from MWEB gardening